Force of Will Boot Camp! Part 2 ~ Readying Our Deck For Our First Tournament

Greetings friends! Welcome to the follow up Force of Will Beginner’s Boot Camp! Last time we talked about starting the game and how to go about finding inspiration for deck design from scratch.
 
Now that its been a couple of weeks, and you have a couple games under your belt, it’s time to start thinking about how to take our deck to the next level and to get started with participating at the tournament level!
 
Obviously the first step to getting ready for a tournament is looking over your deck. Last time we looked at three different possible candidates for deck ideas and some cards that would help those ideas come together. Hopefully you were able to come up with some ideas of your own. Since then you’ve probably played a couple games and started to get a feel for what your deck does, and more importantly, how it could be improved to do it better.
 
Decks are a constant work in progress and you’ll want to be observant when playing of what cards your deck isn’t utilizing and could be cut for cards that would advance your strategy more consistently. Constant experimentation and refining is the key to not only creating the most consistent deck, but also to understanding the game better.
 
I started off with three different deck ideas and over the last couple of weeks I found myself enjoying the water cards in particular. Shion’s enter ability upon judgment is ripe for some enjoyable abuse and decided to expand upon this concept, taking into account of course that Shion allows me to look at the top card of my deck at anytime. However, if we’re going to take things to the tournament level, we can’t be constricted to one attribute anymore. Making a deck that solely uses water will is a narrow method of deck construction. It’s time to start incorporating some other attributes to power up our new deck.

Specifically it is darkness attribute cards that we will consider for this deck. Remember Lucifer? That powerful angel from last time? We want to get him into this deck. His ability to help clear the field, coupled with his high ATK and flying make him a very powerful card. So obviously we’d need to include some darkness will in our magic stone deck. Four Magic Stone of Dark Depths should do the trick. They are able to produce either darkness or water, helping make sure that no matter what we’ll always be able to pay for the the cards in our hand.

In addition to Lucifer there is another card that uses darkness will that is a must have, however this is one we didn’t see last time. It’s a dual attribute card called Space-Time Anomaly. This card will sap a J/resonator of 500 ATK and DEF, while also letting you draw a card. You can use this to destroy weaker cards and weaken stronger cards, all while replenishing your resources. Best of all this card can be cast from the graveyard, meaning that four copies of this card will allow you to cast it eight times. This spell will help keep your opponent’s cards off your back while you establish your own field.

The spell Prison in the Lunar Lake can also be a great addition to this deck. It can cancel automatic abilities and destroy the resonator that was the source of said ability, most notably this card can easily remove Lancelot from the field. It can also knock threats like Adombrali off the board.

Since we’re using Shion, it would also be wise to use Shion’s regalia, the Hydromonica. This will help you cycle the top card of your deck and can be banished to search and put a card on top of your deck. These abilities combined with Shion’s own top card peeking, and cards like Muse and Hymnal’s Memoria make for some fantastic combos that will help you keep your resources plentiful.


It is also important for us to start looking beyond just The Moonlit Savior. Cheshire Cat is a card crucial to any deck focused on using water attribute cards. It will help you cycle through your deck, as well as provide a blocker that is hard to eliminate. Adombrali is another card you may find useful, being able to banish cards like the aforementioned Cheshire Cat to get a stronger resonator on the field as well as draw more cards.

 

Be sure to look at cards of other attributes as well. Darkness cards like Barrier of Shadows and Scorn of Dark Alice will help us slow down our opponent’s strategy by weighing down their regalia, or forcing them to discard key resonators.


However our biggest boon from the past comes from The Seven Kings of The Lands; Celestial Wing Seraph. When this angel hits the field she lets you search for another angel in your main deck with a total cost of four or less and put it into your field for free. Which means the second you drop this card you can immediately put Lucifer into play for free, setting off his own effect which will force your opponent to banish one of their resonators. Both Celestial Wing Seraph and Lucifer are packing Flying, and every time Seraph attacks you’ll gain 300 life for each Angel you control. Now you might be wondering just how we’re going to play Celestial Wing Seraph, considering she’s a light resonator. Well have a look at her total cost, friends. That’s right, a total cost of five. Which means she can be played for free if she’s the top card of our deck when Shion enters the field as a J-ruler, and thanks to Hydromonica we can make sure Seraph is the top card.
 
Keep in mind that this is just one deck idea that can be build using Shion, and is not the only way to build a Shion deck. Rather the idea is to encourage you to consider all possibilities and options when constructing your first deck. It’s easy to confine oneself within the limits of just one set or just one attribute. However, to improve your deck and to improve yourself as a player, it is critical to consider all possibilities and find what works best for you. This extends to Ruler cards as well. Just because I ended up making a Shion deck from the inspiration I took from my initial ten packs, doesn’t mean you should feel bound by this either. Explore the entire library of cards, and find a ruler that strikes your interest.
 
So now that you’ve upgraded your deck, it’s time to participate in your very first tournament. But how does one go about doing that? Likely, the store you bought your booster packs from holds tournaments on some kind of regular basis (usually every week!). However this isn’t always the case. If you’d like to find the official tournament stores near you, check out the official store list right here on the official website!
 
Going to a tournament for the first time, especially if you don’t know anyone yet, can be scary, but a big part of Force of Will is the social nature of the game. You’ll find that participating in tournaments can be a great way to make some fast friends. If you’re still nervous, here are some tips to remember;
 
-It’s a game. Win, lose, or draw. Games are meant to be fun. Play to win, of course, but don’t beat yourself up over a loss.
-Expect mistakes. It’s your first tournament, odds are you’re going to slip up at some point. That’s okay, everyone does. If you learned something, it wasn’t really a mistake.
-Take notes. This doesn’t have to necessarily be during a match, but try to jot down some notes about what you think your deck could use. You can test a deck countless times at home, but putting it up against the unknown human element of another player is a great way to get a new perspective on what your deck could be lacking.
-Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Many experienced players will move quickly from one move to another without allotting much time for you to read what cards they’re playing. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, more a habit formed from playing the game as much as they do and expecting you to have the same knowledge. Everyone was a beginner at some point. Don’t be afraid to ask to read the card. In a similar vein, if you honestly believe someone may be making a play error or cheating, don’t hesitate to call over a judge.
 
We hope you’ve enjoyed these Force of Will Boot Camp articles. Remember to keep experimenting! Good luck with your first tournament!

Written by Jordan E. Blanco