Battle For Attoractia ~ Preview Article 6 ~ Rabbits and Croco-Sharks

Hello again, my friends. We’ve seen all the J/rulers that Battle for Attoractia has to offer, but that doesn’t mean we’ve run out of interesting things to discuss. In fact things only get more interesting, especially with today’s article. Because as it happens, today’s article has a brand new deck strategy and my favorite card in the entire game. It’s shaping up to be a promising spoiler, so let’s get going.

Charge!

While not a ruler in this set, Kaguya is still around, but now she’s a resonator! And what a resonator she is! This Kaguya will enter the field with 800 ATK and DEF for a total cost of three, which is fairly good, right around the usual power for a resonator of that cost. She can even grow stronger once on the field, gaining a +100/+100 counter each time a resonator is put from your field into the graveyard. So the death of your other resonators makes Kaguya stronger! Which is somewhat morbid, but who cares? It’s a useful ability.

As you’ve noticed by now, Kaguya also has a rather lengthy awakening ability. By paying an extra void and moon will you’ll awaken Kaguya, allowing you to search your main deck for up to four rabbit resonators that each have a total cost of one, and put them right into the field. There’s only two resonators that fit that requirement right now, (they’re the next two cards in the article!), but even without looking at them it’s easy to understand that this is some good value. Essentially for two will you’re getting four one cost resonators (assuming four are still in your deck, which is probable) That’s double the value of what you paid for the awakening. But how valuable are the rabbit resonators beyond just incarnation fodder? Let’s have a look!

Apparently all rabbits are albino in this world.

Okay. Simple, but wow that’s a pretty good card. Rabbit of Moonlit Nights has some fair stats for a turn one card (or for whenever you call it out with Kaguya’s awakening). It only has one ability, but it’s a fairly strong one. You can banish the card to rest a J/ruler. An obvious defensive/stalling tactic this can stop a powerful baddie from attacking you, even in a regalia heavy offensive J-ruler deck, but it can do more than that. If this ability is used correctly during the priority sequences before your opponent’s main phase, you can rest your opponent’s J-ruler, which can stop them from calling a magic stone. It might be a bit hard to read your opponent and tell when exactly they are going to rest their J-ruler for a stone, and not something else, but the right call could really put your enemy in a difficult situation. 

Makes a fine stew.

Similarly, Moonbreeze Rabbit is a one cost resonator with the exact same stats, but with a different attribute and different ability. Moonbreeze Rabbit can be banished to produce wind or moon will. Wind is no stranger to will generating resonators, however they usually produce the will be resting, not banishing. That may make this card somewhat weaker in that regard, however this card has the added benefit of being a rabbit. This means it can be searched out and fielded with Kaguya’s awakening ability. Plus it generates moon will that can be used for anything (unlike, say, Apollo), a trait that is in somewhat short supply in the Alice Cluster limited format and New Frontiers, come September.

But they looked so cute!

Alright so obviously there’s a kind of swarm tactic going on with these rabbits, right? They’re cheap and they have an effect that allows them dash onto the field quickly. But both of the rabbit resonators have banish abilities. What happens when they’re dead and gone? Fear not, my friends! Rabbit Trap is here for you! This is a chant-standby with a total cost of four, which means you will absolutely want to play it face down for two void instead (or one darkness with Rezzard!). This is also a chant-standby card with one of the easiest trigger conditions in the game; all it takes is your opponent attacking you with a J/resonator. Once they do, you’ll be able to flip this card and put up to three rabbits in your graveyard right into your field. Basically you’ll always be able to have a good number of rabbits on the field. By using this standby, after you’ve banished a few of your rabbits you can use this spell to bring them back and get even more value out of them.

World dying? I’m out!

Sooooo the battle for Attoractia isn’t looking so hot. Interdimensional Escape is a very powerful spell: chant-instant card that will force each player to banish all but one of their resonators. For something this strong, it’s no wonder it costs three will, thankfully it’s speed will ensure its usefulness. You’ll be able to drop this card during your opponent’s turn just before, or even during, their attacks. The downside is that you’ll be forced to banish your own resonators. HOWEVER! Let’s view a very plausible scenario with this card and a rabbit deck. You’ve got Rabbit Trap face down and your opponent attacks you, you can flip Rabbit Trap, and put it into the chase, then cast this spell. You banish your rabbit resonators and save the strongest card you’ve got on the field (presumably something like Kaguya, which gets stronger when your resonators bite the dust), then Rabbit Trap resolves and you bring back the rabbits you banished to Interdimensional Escape. A spell like this can also find use in a deck focused around an aggressive J-ruler, like Lapis, or a deck that doesn’t mind relying on a single powerful resonator.

The best card.

HAHAHAHA! At long last it is here! Those of you who’ve been joining the weekly live streams know that I’ve been very excited about a card named Croco-Shark, I’ve repeatedly called it my favorite card in the game. Well, it’s finally here my friends! Croco-Shark is a very unique card, because you can have as many copies of it in your deck as you want. Four, ten, thirty, it doesn’t matter! Croco-Shark is all about swarming the field and attacking with a ton of cards. This lovely fellow isn’t all that strong for his cost, with only 200 ATK and DEF. But that’s because the Croco-Shark isn’t meant to be played from the hand, it’s meant to be cast as a stealth card. Croco-Shark’s triggering condition is when you play a summon spell from the hand. Then, when this resonator enters the field from your chant-standby area you can drop another Croco-Shark in your hand to the field. With even two of these in your chant-standby area you can see how easy it is to swarm the field. Croco-Shark also gains and extra 200 ATK and DEF for each other Croco-Shark you control. Behold the entire swarm strategy in a single card! This card works fairly well with Rabbits due to their low cost (you can play them to set off the stealth condition), ability to stall the opponent, and will generation which you’ll want to get as many of these lovely creatures into your chant-standby area as possible. But be careful my friends, a well placed Interdimensional Escape from your opponent can eliminate your swarm. So you’ll want your army to take the field when the opponent doesn’t have the open will to pay for this card, and considering the fairly high cost of Interdimensional Escape makes it fairly obvious when your opponent is planning to use it, it shouldn’t be too hard to work around.

MOON.

Just in case Croco-Shark’s own buffing ability isn’t advancing the power of your resonators fast enogh, the Croco-Sharks even have their own addition: field card, though I suppose it could be used with any deck that uses a lot of the same card. Upon entry, this card will allow you to search for a card with the same name as target resonator. This can be used as a search in any deck, but obviously is most useful in a Croco-Shark deck. Then, once on the field, this card can be rested to increase the ATK and DEF of all cards with the same name as target resonator by 300. Welcome to the win condition of the Croco-Sharks. Get a couple of them on the field, and use this ability, then attack with all of them to overrun your opponent in one strike. But be warned, my friends! Croco-Shark Crossing’s power up ability will affect all resonators with the same name as the target, including your opponent’s cards. So you may want to sideboard swap this card out with Shangri-La should you be up against another Croco-Shark deck.

Also known as friend to the Croco-Sharks.

Here’s an interesting super rare that can help out most any deck, but especially Croco-Sharks! Upon entry Hare of Inaba will let you name a card. Then you reveal the top four cards of your deck and take all copies of the named card that were revealed into your hand. This obviously works very well with Croco-Sharks as you’ll have well over four copies of the resonator in your deck. It can also work fairly well with Shion, who’s top checking ability will guarantee you at least one of the revealed cards. Hare of Inaba also gains both flying and swiftness as long as you control a fantasy resonator, and what card just happens to be a fantasy resonator? You guessed it! The Croco-Shark! So here’s the killing combo; Have a couple Croco-Sharks in stealth mode, drop Hare of Inaba, get some more Croco-Sharks into your hand, flip your Croco-Sharks into the field and drop a few more from your hand for good measure. Now you’ve got a huge force on your field, plus Hare of Inaba can now attack immediately and with flying.
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That’s all for today, but don’t forget to look for Battle For Attoractia packs! In stores July 1st! Check back on Tuesday at 3pm JST for the next article!
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Written by Jordan E. Blanco

4th Set Booter Pack 「Battle for Attoractia 」


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