The Moonlit Savior ~ Preview Article 13 ~ The Chant-Standbys We Deserve

Here we are, my friends. The very last article for The Moonlit Savior. As with Twilight Wanderer, I’ve enjoyed writing these bi-weekly articles for you all. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading them! So for our last article let’s talk about something I’ve been looking forward to since the beginning. The one thing I’ve repeated for weeks whenever anyone ever asks me about cards. At long last my friends, it is time to talk about chant-standby cards.

Now to be fair, we’ve already seen a few chant-standby cards for Moonlit Savior. But you ain’t seen chant-standby cards like these. These are some sweet cards. Let’s have a look, shall we?

We’re not worthy!

First in our cavalcade of awesomeness is Pale Savior. A total cost of three means you probably want to set this card down for two void unless you’ve got a better option for your second turn play. This card will trigger when an opponent’s J/resonator deals damage to you during that turn. Then you’ll be able to flip the card, or cast it from your hand at instant speed. And when you do you can immediately put a total cost four or less light resonator from your hand right into the field. Sadly you cannot put Celestial Wing Seraph into play, but let’s be honest; if you could do that it would be a little too strong. So now the question is, what card works best with this play? While it largely depends on the deck, players may find that Bedivere, despite being a total cost three resonator, is preferable. The removal it grants may overshadow the fact that it might lack a little power compared to total cost four light resonators. Other than Bedivere, players may prefer Dignified Seraph as a simple flying beatstick. Experiment and see which light resonator works best for you!

I always knew the moon couldn’t be trusted.

Next on the chant-standby line up is Prison in the Lunar Lake. This is somewhat of a difficult card to wrap your head around, so I’ll try to explain it as best I can. Again the card costs a total of three will, so it’s better to set this one down for two void if you can. The trigger is a bit tricky, so let’s discuss it. When your opponent plays an automatic ability that came from a resonator that entered their field that very same turn and while you control a water magic stone, you can activate this card. So the second part of this trigger clause is easy to understand, right? You just need to control a water magic stone, it’s the first part of this trigger condition that’s confusing. First you’ll need to understand what an automatic ability is. The best way to do this is to read the Comprehensive Rules available right here on the official website. Simply put automatic abilities are things that happen automatically upon fulfillment of a certain condition. The most common automatic abilities are ones that trigger when a resonator enters the field from a non-field zone. Text like “When this card enters your field…” is a good example of the most commonly used automatic ability. In fact automatic abilities often start with the word “When” or “Whenever”, so keep an eye out for that. So when you do successfully activate this card, what does it do? It will chase to that automatic ability, cancel it, and destroy the resonator that was its source. Since this doesn’t target you can actually use this to destroy a card like Cheshire Cat, but perhaps more excitingly, this can be used to destroy Lancelot, since Lancelot’s last ability always triggers, regardless of whether it actually has high enough ATK to deal 700 damage. Adombrali is another card that can come under easy fire from this card. Players will need to be wary of this card or chance losing a precious resource.

Snake? Snake? Snaaaaake!

The third of our four standby cards is Ambush! Yes the exclamation point is actually part of the card’s name. This one only costs a total of two will, so it’s up to you to set it down or keep two stones open and have the card remain in your hand. This spell’s trigger condition is probably the easiest to understand, you can activate it when a J/resonator your opponent controls attacks. It doesn’t even have to be attacking you, it could be attacking one of your own J/resonators. Then by flipping or casting this card from your hand, you’ll be able to put a total cost three or lower wind resonator in your hand right into the field. Three might not seem like much, but wind has some great three cost resonators. Most notably both of the Pricia resonators. Whether it’s Beast Queen In Hiding, or Pursuant of Exploding Flame both can be strong plays. Pursuant of Exploding Flame can function as an emergency blocker that manages to deal damage upon death (which very well might KO your opponent) and Beast Queen In Hiding can be great to drop down on your opponent’s turn and then set up for massive damage on your turn. This card is simple and helps you play some of the strongest wind resonators in the current format.

Gimme, gimme, gimme a demon after midnight.

Though we’ve got other cards to talk about today, this is the last one that’s a chant-standby. I know, I’m disappointed too. Nighttime Raiders functions kind of like the opposite of Pale Savior. It’s back to a total cost of three for this card, so pick your poison of setting it early or playing it from the hand later. This card will trigger when a resonator you control successfully deals damage to your opponent this turn. When you flip or cast this card you’ll be able to put a total cost five darkness resonator in your hand into the field. However, some of your best options aren’t actually total cost five darkness resonators. Arthur, the Dead Lord of Vengeance, Mephistopheles, and the recently revealed Lucifer are all some of the best cards you could play with this spell and they are all total cost four resonators. Take a good look at all darkness resonators sitting at total cost four or five and pick out which ones work best for your deck.

Stay a while and listen.

Let’s move onto a resonator. Heart Stirring Sage is an interesting total cost one resonator. With 0 ATK and 600 DEF this card can block even Cthugha  and Snow White, an impressive feat for a card you can drop on the first turn. It also packs a very interesting effect. By resting this old fellow target resonators ATK become equal to its DEF until end of turn. Notice that it doesn’t swap ATK and DEF. So this is a great effect to use on cards that have 0 ATK, but very high defense. Suddenly Fruit of Yggdrasil and Deployable Defense Device become terrifying threats. Heart Stirring Sage has some very interesting combo possibilities.

It’s like when you open a door and the draft hits you.

Oh boy. Now this is a card. A total cost one counter card. Granted the counter is stoppable, after all it only increases the cost of target spell by one void. However, consider how incredibly valuable this card is during early game. If your opponent tries to drop Lancelot on turn two, or something like Pricia on turn three, this card is nearly a guaranteed cancel. Not to mention, this counter is not only limited to summon spells, anything can be cancelled with Wall of Wind. Don’t underestimate this spell, even if your opponent pays the extra one void to prevent the spell from being cancelled, it may leave them unable to play a second spell. Wall of Wind is all around amazing.

Four star rating on Yelp.

The counter spells just keep on coming. This one, oddly enough, comes in the form of an Addition: Field. Like many recent field cards, when Wind Secluded Refuge hits the field, you’ll be able to draw a card, replacing this one. That’s a nice way to maintain hand advantage. This card will sit on your field as an Addition: Field until you wish to utilize its second effect. By banishing this card you can cancel spell or ability that is currently targeting a J/resonator you control. A neat kind of delayed counter, that will allow you to drop it when you have the open will, and not worry about keeping stones open to play it every single turn. The downside is, of course, that your opponent may destroy it while it sits out on the field. Most decks that have cards that can destroy additions have those cards in the sideboard, and even then the majority of decks foolishly assume addition cards will not be a threat. Make them regret these choices my friends.

Access denied.

Our very last card for this spoiler season is Seal of Wind and Light. This is a straight up no nonsense counter. It is a total cost of two with one wind and one light. Obviously this card is geared towards Kaguya, but other wind heavy decks can certainly utilize this card with Wind Sprite and dual stones. Seal of Wind and Light is a straight counter. It will stop any spell it can chase to. And while most of the time counter cards aren’t countered back, this card has an awakening for one moon will that will prevent your opponent from chasing to it, just in case you’re wary they’ve got a Wall of Wind in their hand. This card, and really all the abundance of counter spells in Moonlit Savior are sure to slow down the game pace and take a big bite out of early aggression.

That’s all for now, but expect us to be back in a month or two for the next exciting set! Thanks for reading, my friends. Play smart, trust statistics, and have fun! I’ll see you soon!
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That’s all for The Moonlit Savior Preview Articles! And look for The Moonlit Savior, in stores on March 11th!
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Written by Jordan E. Blanco

3rd Set Booster Pack 「The Moonlit Savior 」


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