The Moonlit Savior ~ Preview Article 9 ~ How Long is Forever?

Several weeks ago we looked at Alisaris, also known as The Observer. We’ve already seen a few cards that support his unique strategy of removing your own cards from the game to set off his Judgment, however the cards we’ve seen up until now have not been enough to really give him the power he needs to compete with other decks. Thankfully, just as Lapis has the Twelve Apostles, Alisaris has his three goddesses. The harbingers of the destruction of past, present and future. Let’s take a look.

Great Scott!

First is Urd, the keeper of the past. Urd is the most expensive of the three goddesses, with a total cost of three. She enters the field with 800 ATK and DEF, which is pretty nice. Stats like that mean she can beat out cards like Snow White and Lancelot (she can even survive Lancelot’s 700 damage shot), and go toe to toe with Gareth. Sadly, she lacks swiftness, but let’s take a look at what she does have. When she hits the field you can remove up to two cards in your graveyard from the game. When you do, you add up the total cost of those two removed cards and multiply it by 200. Then Urd deals that much damage to a J/resonator. A neat little ability that will help you remove cards to bring The Observer closer to using his Judgment, while also removing a troublesome J/resonator from the field. Urd can function as a tough card on the field, with the added bonus of supporting her ruler and removal, all for three will. That’s pretty handy. The best part is that Urd can actually get stronger. As long as you have ten cards removed from game (which you should have pretty fast if you’re using Alisaris) Urd will gain an extra 300 ATK and DEF as well as Target Attack, bringing her to a hearty 1100 ATK and DEF and now able to choose what she wants to destroy. That is a big threat, that can become a reality quite quickly considering every card in an Alisaris deck revolves around self removal.
The clock’s been broken for ages. But hey, it’s right twice a day.

Next in the trio is Verdandi, the keeper of the present. Here is your turn one play with The Observer. She enters with only 100 ATK and DEF, but turn one cards usually don’t do much in terms of aggression anyway. If you really needed turn one attacks you could always banish her for Cthugha (which would put a card in your graveyard to remove later with Urd, so that might actually be a good idea). When Verdandi hits the field you can remove a card in your hand from the game, which sounds pretty awful. However, when you do you also get to draw a new card. So it’s basically hand cycling, that also helps Alisaris. You filter out a high cost card you don’t need early on, and reduce your Judgment cost. That’s some pretty good value right there. Obviously Verdandi isn’t going to be dishing out the massive damage. However, just like Urd, she gains a power up when you have ten cards removed from the game. Her power up is also, significantly larger. She gains 900 ATK and DEF, putting her at 1000 for each, and she gains First Strike. Perhaps a little more situationally useful than Target Attack, but it does mean she’ll have the edge against cards with identical stats, so that is always helpful. Verdandi is a great turn one play resonator that can increase even further in value, should she survive to mid and late game.

Think of time like a taco. the outer shell is first to be eaten. We survived in the center.

The last of the three goddesses, and the super rare of the three; is Skuld, keeper of the future. Skuld is a total cost two (hey, there’s a one cost, a two cost, and a three cost. Huh, it’s almost like that was intentional or something). She enters with 500 ATK and DEF which is pretty standard fare for a total cost two resonator. This does mean she’ll lose out to more aggressive two cost resonators like Lancelot, but let’s not write her off just yet. When she enters the field, you remove the top two cards of your main deck from the game then add up the combined total cost of those two removed cards and and deal damage to a J/resonator equal to that combined total cost times 100. A little weaker than Urd’s ability, considering in most cases you won’t know the total cost of the top two cards of your main deck (what if they’re both zero cost regalia?!), and even if they are high cost, it is only times 100 as opposed to Urd’s ability which multiplies by 200, but that’s the difference between a two cost resonator and a three cost resonator I suppose. Of course the benefit is that you don’t need to worry about having the resources available to remove. Your main deck should always have enough cards to remove the top two with Skuld’s ability, unlike Urd which may require you to intentionally banish your own resonators or discard them to take full advantage of her ability. Like past and present before her, Skuld also gains a power up once you have ten cards removed from the game. She gains 300 ATK and DEF and Swiftness. Which can be good if you drop one or two of this in mid or late game, but unless you’re somehow removing ten cards from the game on your second turn, this effect won’t be doing much in the early part of the match. However it does mean that dropping two Skuld’s on your fourth turn could be a strong move. Putting two 800 ATK and DEF resonators into play with swiftness could certainly close the gap between you and your opponent, or even win you the game.

This spell uses a little theory I like to to call Choco-Taco Time.

So we’ve had our fair share of resonators for today, right friends? I can’t hear you so it doesn’t matter what you said. Let’s take a look at some neat spells. This one was tailor made to help keep an Alisaris deck’s advantage going. A Spell: Chant card with a total cost of one that will let you take any card in your removed area, and put it right into your hand. Considering how much self removal you’ll be doing, this is some really convenient searching, allowing you to get the exact card you need at the right time. Sadly, this card is not instant speed, so you won’t be able to play it after drawing, but before recovery. However the card still has its uses. Players who plan ahead will be able to fix their hand for their next turn, or nab that Ifreet Orb that they just couldn’t seem to draw this game. Lumia players may also enjoy this spell for similar reasons, as she also works around removing one’s own cards from the game.

Alisaris always alliterates…allosaurus.

Hey, there’s our Spell: Chant-Instant card! And wouldn’t you know it, it’s also a total cost one card. It’s a removal card tailored for Alisaris, though it could work with other removal J/rulers like Lumia, too. It deals 100 damage to a resonator for each card you’ve got removed from game. So obviously not a first turn play in most cases, but mid to late game this card is an extremely cheap way to remove larger threats. The combined damage from playing Urd or Skuld can pretty much wipe out all but the very strongest of resonators. Since Alisaris himself is a bit slow to get into the field, removal spells like this one will be crucial to stalling out your opponent and maintaining advantage on the field.
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Be sure to check back on Tuesday for another preview article! And look for The Moonlit Savior, in stores on March 11th!
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Written by Jordan E. Blanco

3rd Set Booster Pack 「The Moonlit Savior 」


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